woensdag 19 november 2014 - 20:00 tot 21:30
The Battle for Resources

The Secret War: Gladio and the Battle for Eurasia

James Corbett
Locatie: 
Doopsgezinde Kerk, Oude Boteringestraat 33, Groningen
Tickets: 
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‘Gladio B’, a clandestine NATO-operation,  covers  a tangled web of covert operatives, billionaire Imams and drug running.  . It’s goal: the destabilization of Central Asia and the Caucasus

Stretching from China's doorstep in Kazakhstan's east to the shores of the Black Sea in the west, the Central Asia/Caucasus region encompasses a geostrategically vital area in China and Russia's back yard. It is the economic lifeline of the ‘New Silk Road’ and the increasingly important oil and gas deposits of the Caspian basin. The region also happens to have an ongoing problem with Islamic terrorism.  

Now a growing number of commentators, a mounting pile of evidence and at least one important government whistleblower have drawn attention to a little-known clandestine NATO operation known as ‘Gladio’ that was exposed in the 1990s and is still in motion today. Its main area of operation is this resource-rich Central Asian/Caucasus region. ‘Operation Gladio B’, the continuation of Gladio, covers a tangled web of covert operatives, billionaire Imams, drug running, prison breaks and terror strikes. It’s goal, the destabilization of Central Asia and the Caucasus, is connected to the Great Powers' quest for energy and mineral resources. This secret war that increasingly threatens to draw Russia and China into conflict with NATO.

James Corbett is the editor, host, producer and webmaster of The Corbett Report, an open source news and information resource on global geopolitics, macroeconomics, history, philosophy and social issues. He has been living and working in Japan since 2004 and founded CorbettReport.com in 2007 as an outlet for independent critical analysis of major news stories and world events. 

Lezing gemist: 

Gladio B and the Battle for Eurasia